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Shy/Silent Users of Contraceptives in Pakistan [with Comments]

Sultan S. Hashmi and Mohammad Afzal
The Pakistan Development Review
Vol. 35, No. 4, Papers and Proceedings PART II Twelfth Annual General Meeting of the Pakistan Society of Development Economists Islamabad, December 14-16, 1996 (Winter 1996), pp. 705-717
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41259993
Page Count: 13
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Shy/Silent Users of Contraceptives in Pakistan [with Comments]
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Abstract

Based on the data of three national surveys, 1984-85 Pakistan Contraceptive Prevalence Survey (PCPS), 1990-91 Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey (PDHS), and 1994-95 Pakistan Contraceptive Prevalence Survey (PCPS), the hypothesis of shy/silent users is tested. These surveys were undertaken with the collaboration of the Westing House, IRD/Macro International and Local Office in Islamabad of the Population Council, New York respectively. The concept of shy/silent users is defined as those respondents who, at the time of interview, did not divulge that they were users of contraceptive methods or traditional ways of preventing conception or birth due to cultural reasons. All three surveys show substantial numbers of shy/silent users. If these numbers are included, the Current Prevalence Rate (CPR) of each survey rises significantly. But the CPR inspite of including shy users, is still far lower than most developing and neighbouring countries.

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