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Persistent Food Insecurity from Policy Failures in Pakistan

Zakir Hussain and Waqar Akram
The Pakistan Development Review
Vol. 47, No. 4, Papers and Proceedings PARTS I and II Twenty-fourth Annual General Meeting and Conference of the Pakistan Society of Development Economists Islamabad, March 31-April 2, 2009 (Winter 2008), pp. 817-834
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41261257
Page Count: 18
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Persistent Food Insecurity from Policy Failures in Pakistan
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Abstract

The observable fact was known to be hunger in the 1980s but now terminology has been shifted to insecurity. Improving the household food security is an issue of supreme importance in millions of people in the world who are suffering from persistent hunger and malnutrition and those who are at risk of doing such in the future. Many developing countries are making efforts to improve this situation but they are facing budgetary and resource constraints. Achieving a sufficient food supply and making it sustainable remains a global challenge. Indus agriculture system in Pakistan has experienced a Green Revolution and is striving for yellow and blue revolutions. However, it could have not done far better due to inconsistent and incompatible agriculture policies. Wheat, rice and maize are the dominant food crops in Pakistan. Several programmes and policies have attempted to increase the productivity of these crops and help consumers against better access to food.

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