If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Transgressing the Limits of Interpretation: Edward Albee's "The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia? (Notes toward a Definition of Tragedy)"

Boróka Prohászka Rád
Hungarian Journal of English and American Studies (HJEAS)
Vol. 15, No. 1, Expanding American Theatre History (Spring, 2009), pp. 135-153
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41274461
Page Count: 19
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Transgressing the Limits of Interpretation: Edward Albee's
Preview not available

Abstract

The essay looks at Edward Albee's The Goat or Who Is Sylvia? (Notes toward Definition of Tragedy), employing Victor Turner's and René Girard's interdisciplinary theories of ritual, scapegoating, and drama as well as concepts and terms of current theories on subjectivity formation. The analysis focuses on the protagonist family's drama as a Turnerian liminal situation within which the Grays are displaced from their former subject positions and find themselves lacking any new basis for constructing new identities for themselves. The essay also argues for a reassessment of Girard's concept of the single scapegoat, interpreting all three family members as sacrificial victims within the context of their betwixt-and-between state. The essay also sets out to identify those elements of classical tragedy that Albee re-actualizes, demonstrating that through the merger of styles, linguistic registers, and genres The Goat transgresses the limits of traditional tragedy and subverts any attempt at fixing the play within the limits of a single valid interpretation.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[135]
    [135]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
136
    136
  • Thumbnail: Page 
137
    137
  • Thumbnail: Page 
138
    138
  • Thumbnail: Page 
139
    139
  • Thumbnail: Page 
140
    140
  • Thumbnail: Page 
141
    141
  • Thumbnail: Page 
142
    142
  • Thumbnail: Page 
143
    143
  • Thumbnail: Page 
144
    144
  • Thumbnail: Page 
145
    145
  • Thumbnail: Page 
146
    146
  • Thumbnail: Page 
147
    147
  • Thumbnail: Page 
148
    148
  • Thumbnail: Page 
149
    149
  • Thumbnail: Page 
150
    150
  • Thumbnail: Page 
151
    151
  • Thumbnail: Page 
152
    152
  • Thumbnail: Page 
153
    153