Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Novel Radiation Response Genes Identified in Gene-Trapped MCF10A Mammary Epithelial Cells

Jennifer Malone and Robert Ullrich
Radiation Research
Vol. 167, No. 2 (Feb., 2007), pp. 176-184
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4127451
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($10.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Novel Radiation Response Genes Identified in Gene-Trapped MCF10A Mammary Epithelial Cells
Preview not available

Abstract

We have used a gene-trapping strategy to screen human mammary epithelial cells for radiation response genes. Relative mRNA expression levels of five candidate genes in MCF10A cells were analyzed, both with and without exposure to radiation. In all five cases, the trapped genes were significantly down-regulated after radiation treatment. Sequence analysis of the fusion transcripts identified the trapped genes: (1) the human androgen receptor, (2) the uncharacterized DREV1 gene, which has known homology to DNA methyl-transferases, (3) the human creatine kinase gene, (4) the human eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 beta 2, and (5) the human ribosomal protein L27. All five genes were down-regulated significantly after treatment with varying doses of ionizing radiation (0.10 to 4.0 Gy) and at varying times (2-30 h after treatment). The genes were also analyzed in human fibroblast and lymphoblastoid cell lines to determine whether the radiation response being observed was cell-type specific. The results verified that the observed radiation response was not a cell-type-specific phenomenon, suggesting that the genes play essential roles in the radiation damage control pathways. This study demonstrates the potential of the gene-trap approach for the identification and functional analysis of novel radiation response genes.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
176
    176
  • Thumbnail: Page 
177
    177
  • Thumbnail: Page 
178
    178
  • Thumbnail: Page 
179
    179
  • Thumbnail: Page 
180
    180
  • Thumbnail: Page 
181
    181
  • Thumbnail: Page 
182
    182
  • Thumbnail: Page 
183
    183
  • Thumbnail: Page 
184
    184