Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Social Exchange — Sociological Theory Towards a Cultural Perspective?

MARIAN KEMPNY
Polish Sociological Review
No. 104 (1993), pp. 315-329
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41274515
Page Count: 15
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Social Exchange — Sociological Theory Towards a Cultural Perspective?
Preview not available

Abstract

The search for a metatheoretical framework to comparatively analyze social exchange theories leads to the claim that two crossing polar axes are needed to map a variety of approaches which fall under the broad social exchange paradigm. The first axis involves the opposition between intentional and consequentional analysis: exchange processes are explained either in terms of intentions of human agents involved in exchange relations or the rationale of exchange phenomena is sought in their consequences for the social system. The second axis reveals the split ingo individualistic and collectivistic exchange theories. An explication of both dilemmas is substantiated by a discussion of Lévi-Strauss and Homans' contending explanations of the prevalence of some forms of cross-cousin marriage. Following the identification of the four regions of metatheoretical space, various sociological and anthropological exchange theories are located in there. The anthropological interpretation of the exchange phenomena is examined at some length and its peculiar features are emphasized in contrast with the sociological approach in its old and new varieties, including the "elementary theory." It is concluded that anthropological revisions of classic sociological approaches and recent sociological network exchange theories move in opposite directions, however, both trends respond to the present state of social theory and are part and parcel of the current process of overall transformation of social thought.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[315]
    [315]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
316
    316
  • Thumbnail: Page 
317
    317
  • Thumbnail: Page 
318
    318
  • Thumbnail: Page 
319
    319
  • Thumbnail: Page 
320
    320
  • Thumbnail: Page 
321
    321
  • Thumbnail: Page 
322
    322
  • Thumbnail: Page 
323
    323
  • Thumbnail: Page 
324
    324
  • Thumbnail: Page 
325
    325
  • Thumbnail: Page 
326
    326
  • Thumbnail: Page 
327
    327
  • Thumbnail: Page 
328
    328
  • Thumbnail: Page 
329
    329