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Low-Dose Radiation Response of Primary Keratinocytes and Fibroblasts from Patients with Cervix Cancer

Dorota Słonina, Beata Biesaga, Krzysztof Urbański and Zbigniew Kojs
Radiation Research
Vol. 167, No. 3 (Mar., 2007), pp. 251-259
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4127478
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Low-Dose Radiation Response of Primary Keratinocytes and Fibroblasts from Patients with Cervix Cancer
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Abstract

The aim of the present study was to examine, using the micronucleus (MN) assay, the low-dose radiation response of normal skin cells from cancer patients and to determine whether the hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS)-like phenomenon occurs in cells of these patients. Primary skin fibroblasts and keratinocytes derived from 40 patients with cervix cancer were studied. After in vitro γ irradiation with single doses ranging from 0.05 to 4 Gy, MN induction was assessed. For each patient, the linear-quadratic (LQ) model and the induced repair (IR) model were fitted over the whole data set. In fits of the IR model, an HRS-like response after low doses (seen as the deviation over the LQ curve) was demonstrated for the fibroblasts of two patients and for the keratinocytes of four other patients. The $\alpha_s/\alpha_r$ ratio for the six patients ranged from 2.7 to 15.4, whereas the values of the parameter dc ranged from 0.13 to 0.36 Gy. No relationship was observed between chromosomal radiosensitivity of fibroblasts and keratinocytes derived from the same donor in the low-dose (0.1-0.25 Gy) region. In conclusion, the fact that low-dose chromosomal hypersensitivity was observed for cells of only six of the patients studied suggests that it is not a common finding in human normal cells and can represent an individual characteristic.

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