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Imagining a Canadian Identity through Sport: A Historical Interpretation of Lacrosse and Hockey

Michael A. Robidoux
The Journal of American Folklore
Vol. 115, No. 456, Folklore in Canada (Spring, 2002), pp. 209-225
DOI: 10.2307/4129220
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4129220
Page Count: 17
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Imagining a Canadian Identity through Sport: A Historical Interpretation of Lacrosse and Hockey
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Abstract

Sport in Canada during the late 19th century was intended to promote physical excellence, emotional restraint, fair play, and discipline; yet these ideological principles were consistently undermined by the manner in which Canadians played the game of hockey. This article explores the genesis of violence in hockey by focusing on its vernacular origins and discusses the relevance of violence as an expression of Canadian national identity in terms of First Nations and French Canadian expressions of sport.

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