Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

Journal Article

Review: CALIFORNIA IRREDENTA: Golden Dreams: California in an Age of Abundance 1950-1963 by Kevin Starr

Reviewed Work: Golden Dreams: California in an Age of Abundance 1950-1963 by Kevin Starr
Review by: Josef Chytry
History and Theory
Vol. 50, No. 2 (May 2011), pp. 270-284
Published by: Wiley for Wesleyan University
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41300084
Page Count: 15
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
CALIFORNIA IRREDENTA
Preview not available

Abstract

Kevin Starr's Golden Dreams is the culmination to some forty years of scholarship on the unfolding theme of a "California Dream," that imaginai component to the growth of the self-identity and increasing international economic power of the most populous state in the American Union. Indeed, the period 1950-1963 that the book meticulously covers forms in many ways the most imposing manifestation of that Dream. This essay reviews the central features of Starr's account, particularly the infrastructural foundations in transportation, water supply, and higher education realized by a triumvirate of California governors, both Republican and Democrat, who regarded themselves as nonpartisan members of the "Party of California"; the expansion of California's major cities: Los Angeles, San Diego, and San Francisco; the characteristics of the Silent Generation and the culture of "cool Jazz" that dominated the period; as well as the rise of dissident elements among environmentalists, minorities, and Beats, that foretold the protest period of the 1960s. This essay then asks whether Starr has avoided the larger implications of his own narrative that California from this period on had become in most respects a putative nation-state in its own right. From the global impact of its major media industry—Hollywood—to the continued advances of its economic clout throughout the rest of the century as at times the fifth largest economic entity in the world, California may need to be increasingly regarded as a world civilization in itself rather than as a regional civilization to which Starr's historical narrative has so far constricted it.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[270]
    [270]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
271
    271
  • Thumbnail: Page 
272
    272
  • Thumbnail: Page 
273
    273
  • Thumbnail: Page 
274
    274
  • Thumbnail: Page 
275
    275
  • Thumbnail: Page 
276
    276
  • Thumbnail: Page 
277
    277
  • Thumbnail: Page 
278
    278
  • Thumbnail: Page 
279
    279
  • Thumbnail: Page 
280
    280
  • Thumbnail: Page 
281
    281
  • Thumbnail: Page 
282
    282
  • Thumbnail: Page 
283
    283
  • Thumbnail: Page 
284
    284