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Knowing What's Up and Learning What You're Not Supposed to: Hip-Hop Collegians, Higher Education, and the Limits of Critical Consciousness

Emery Petchauer
Journal of Black Studies
Vol. 42, No. 5 (JULY 2011), pp. 768-790
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41304554
Page Count: 23
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Knowing What's Up and Learning What You're Not Supposed to: Hip-Hop Collegians, Higher Education, and the Limits of Critical Consciousness
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Abstract

This qualitative portraiture study explores the different ways that college students deeply involved in hip-hop at two universities (i. e., hip-hop collegians) made their personal experiences in hip-hop relevant to their educational pursuits. The results of this study illustrate how students applied their experiences with the critical discourses of hip-hop music and the questioning discourse of hip-hop more generally to their perspectives of university education and their specific academic pursuits. This article also details the limits of these critical perspectives by illustrating how a subsample of hip-hop turntablists did not mobilize the critical and political perspectives that other participants embraced. Overall, this article focuses on the different ways that young adults from various ethnic backgrounds make a cultural artifact created primarily by Black communities relevant to their educational lives.

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