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The disjointed distribution of Anacamptis longicomu in the West-Mediterranean: The role of vicariance versus long-distance seed dispersal

Anis Zitari, Valentina Tranchida-Lombardo, Donata Cafasso, Ahmed Noureddine Helal, Giovanni Scopece and Salvatore Cozzolino
Taxon
Vol. 60, No. 4 (August 2011), pp. 1041-1049
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41317325
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The disjointed distribution of Anacamptis longicomu in the West-Mediterranean: The role of vicariance versus long-distance seed dispersal
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Abstract

Tertiary geological processes and Quaternary climatic oscillations significantly contributed in determining plant species ranges in the Mediterranean basin, making it difficult to distinguish between relative influence of habitat fragmentation and long-distance dispersal in shaping actual species distribution across disjointed regions. We studied the phylogeographic structure of Anacamptis longicomu, a Western Mediterranean orchid species spanning over the main continental islands (Sicily, Sardinia, Corsica, Balearic Islands) and North Africa. We aimed to answer the question whether the highly disjointed distribution of this orchid was determined by: (1) recent over-sea dispersion after the last glacial phase; (2) range fragmentation after the refilling of Mediterranean basin at the end of the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC); (3) ancient dispersal events linked to the insurgence of favourable bioclimatic conditions in the basin. Haplotype differentiation, haplotype network, and mismatch analysis support the hypothesis that the current distribution of A. longicomu is more likely explained by allopatric separation and restricted gene flow in connection with fragmentation of a continuous range or a series of ancient dispersal events, after the MSC but before the most recent glaciations. Recent over-sea dispersion, if occurring, must have played a marginal role.

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