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Toponymy of Herschel Island (Qikiqtaryuk), Western Arctic Coast, Canada

C.R. BURN and JOHN B. HATTENDORF
Arctic
Vol. 64, No. 4 (DECEMBER 2011), pp. 459-464
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41319240
Page Count: 6
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Toponymy of Herschel Island (Qikiqtaryuk), Western Arctic Coast, Canada
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Abstract

The official names for several of the features on Herschel Island are derived from the visit to the island by USS Thetis, Lt. Cdr. Charles Stockton commanding, on 15-16 August 1889. In 24 hours, Stockton and his crew surveyed the coast sufficiently to compile and publish a map, which included the bathymetry of Pauline Cove and the strait between the island and the mainland, now called Workboat Passage. Stockton named features after two whaling ships that were in the vicinity when he arrived (Orca and Thrasher), his own Thetis, his wife (Pauline Lethilhon King), three ensigns to whom he assigned bathymétrie surveys (Robert Lopez, Edward Simpson, and Rogers Wells, Jr.), two of his other officers (Lt. Arthur Osborn and Ensign John Bell), and an officer of the Royal Navy (Capt. Sir Richard Collinson). Only one feature, Avadlek Spit, has an Inuvialuktun official name. Le nom officiel de plusieurs des accidents géographiques de l'île Herschel découle de la visite de l'île par le capitaine de corvette Charles Stockton en tête du USS Thetis, les 15 et 16 août 1889. En 24 heures, Charles Stockton et les membres de son équipage ont fait des levés de la côte suffisamment approfondis pour pouvoir compiler et publier une carte, qui comprenait notamment la bathymétrie de l'anse Pauline et le détroit séparant l'île de la terre ferme, qui porte maintenant le nom de Workboat Passage. Charles Stockton a nommé les accidents géographiques d'après deux baleiniers qui se trouvaient dans les environs à leur arrivée (Orca et Thrasher), ainsi que d'après son propre bateau, soit le Thetis, sa femme (Pauline Lethilhon King), trois porte-étendards auxquels les levés bathymétriques avaient été confiés (Robert Lopez, Edward Simpson et Rogers Wells, fils), deux de ses autres officiers (le lieutenant Arthur Osborn et le porte-étendard John Bell) et un officier de la Marine royale (le capitaine Sir Richard Collinson). Un seul accident géographique, soit l'Avadlek Spit, porte un nom inuvialuktun officiel.

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