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Landscapes of Terror and Control: Imperial Impacts in Paphlagonia

Roger Matthews
Near Eastern Archaeology
Vol. 67, No. 4 (Dec., 2004), pp. 200-211
DOI: 10.2307/4132387
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4132387
Page Count: 12
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Abstract

The region of north-central Anatolia, known to the Romans as Paphlagonia, was always a backwater populated by rough and troublesome tribes. A new archaeological survey has recovered evidence for distinctive settlement patterns from two major periods of the Paphlagonian past. The survey has revealed a network of fortified sites, tracks and look-out posts from the middle of the second millennium BCE that bear testimony to the efforts of the Hittite kings to control the belicose tribes that constantly threatened the security of their frontier during the Late Bronze Age. Much later, following the the Pax Romana, in the late Byzantine period, 700-1350 CE, the region saw a reversion to conflict as Arab and Turkish newcomers disrupted existing settlement patterns, obliging the inhabitants to build fortified refuge sites, generating a landscape of terror.

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