Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

NEW PERSPECTIVES ON MEADOWOOD TRADE ITEMS

Karine Taché
American Antiquity
Vol. 76, No. 1 (January 2011), pp. 41-79
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41331874
Page Count: 39
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($9.95)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
NEW PERSPECTIVES ON MEADOWOOD TRADE ITEMS
Preview not available

Abstract

In Early Woodland times, the creation of vast interaction spheres resulted in the widespread circulation of various objects and raw materials across northeastern North America. In this article, I discuss the contexts and spatial distribution ofMeadowood trade items from over 240 archaeological sites. Traditionally viewed by William A. Ritchie as cult-related items, Meadowood artifacts have subsequently been interpreted as participating in a risk-buffering strategy. Alternatively, I present arguments supporting the role of Meadowood artifacts as part of a strategy used by a few individuals or corporate groups to increase their status through privilege access to rare and highly valued goods. Socially valued goods can be used in multiple ways and documenting this complexity is a prerequisite to understanding the mechanisms underlying the circulation of goods within the Meadowood Interaction Sphere, the structure of the network, and the incentives of the participating groups. This article stresses the need to move beyond the dichotomy between utilitarian/subsistence-related goods and non-utilitarian/ritual artifacts. Au Sylvicole inférieur, la mise en place de vastes sphères d'interaction permet la circulation de divers produits et matières premières à travers le Nord-Est américain. Dans cet article, j'effectue une analyse contextuelle et spatiale de produits d'échange Meadowood provenant de plus de 240 sites archéologiques. D'abord considérés par William A. Ritchie comme objets de culte funéraire, on a ensuite cru que les artefacts Meadowood participaient à une stratégie de gestion des risques lors d'échanges réciproques et adaptatifs. Je présente ici des arguments en faveur d'une interprétation sociopolitique des artefacts Meadowood, où certains individus ou groupes d'individus utiliseraient leur accès privilégié à des biens rares et prestigieux pour augmenter leur statut social. L'étude des mécanismes de circulation des biens, de la structure du réseau et des motivations justifiant une participation à la sphère d'interaction Meadowood exige une meilleure compréhension de la multiplicité et de la complexité des usages réservés à de tels objets de prestige. Cet article insiste sur l'importance de dépasser la simple dichotomie entre objets utilitaires/reliés à la subsistance et objets non-utilitaires/rituels.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
41
    41
  • Thumbnail: Page 
42
    42
  • Thumbnail: Page 
43
    43
  • Thumbnail: Page 
44
    44
  • Thumbnail: Page 
45
    45
  • Thumbnail: Page 
46
    46
  • Thumbnail: Page 
47
    47
  • Thumbnail: Page 
48
    48
  • Thumbnail: Page 
49
    49
  • Thumbnail: Page 
50
    50
  • Thumbnail: Page 
51
    51
  • Thumbnail: Page 
52
    52
  • Thumbnail: Page 
53
    53
  • Thumbnail: Page 
54
    54
  • Thumbnail: Page 
55
    55
  • Thumbnail: Page 
56
    56
  • Thumbnail: Page 
57
    57
  • Thumbnail: Page 
58
    58
  • Thumbnail: Page 
59
    59
  • Thumbnail: Page 
60
    60
  • Thumbnail: Page 
61
    61
  • Thumbnail: Page 
62
    62
  • Thumbnail: Page 
63
    63
  • Thumbnail: Page 
64
    64
  • Thumbnail: Page 
65
    65
  • Thumbnail: Page 
66
    66
  • Thumbnail: Page 
67
    67
  • Thumbnail: Page 
68
    68
  • Thumbnail: Page 
69
    69
  • Thumbnail: Page 
70
    70
  • Thumbnail: Page 
71
    71
  • Thumbnail: Page 
72
    72
  • Thumbnail: Page 
73
    73
  • Thumbnail: Page 
74
    74
  • Thumbnail: Page 
75
    75
  • Thumbnail: Page 
76
    76
  • Thumbnail: Page 
77
    77
  • Thumbnail: Page 
78
    78
  • Thumbnail: Page 
79
    79