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What Counts as the demos? Some Notes on the Relationship between the Jury and "The People" in Classical Athens

Alastair J. L. Blanshard
Phoenix
Vol. 58, No. 1/2 (Spring - Summer, 2004), pp. 28-48
DOI: 10.2307/4135195
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4135195
Page Count: 21
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
What Counts as the demos? Some Notes on the Relationship between the Jury and "The People" in Classical Athens
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Abstract

This paper examines the relationship between the Athenian jury and the Athenian demos. It concludes that traditional ways of defining this relationship are too rigid and do not provide an adequate explanation for the variety of formulations found in our literary, philosophic and epigraphic sources. A more flexible approach is required. Comparative material is provided to illustrate both the provisional nature of beliefs about the jury and the sociological utility of a lack of consensus about jury identity. /// Cet article analyse la relation entre le jury et le demos athéniens. Il montre que les manières traditionelles de définir cette relation sont trop rigides et ne proposent pas d'explication appropriée pour les expressions diverses que l'on trouve dans nos sources littéraires, philosophiques, et épigraphiques. Il convient d'adopter une approche plus flexible. Le matériel comparatif proposé permet d'illustrer à la fois le caractère non définitif des opinions sur le jury et l'utilité sociologique d'un manque de concensus sur son identité.

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