Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Analysis of French Shwa: Or, How to Get Something for Nothing

Stephen R. Anderson
Language
Vol. 58, No. 3 (Sep., 1982), pp. 534-573
DOI: 10.2307/413848
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/413848
Page Count: 40
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Analysis of French Shwa: Or, How to Get Something for Nothing
Preview not available

Abstract

A number of classical problems in the phonology of French are considered, especially as they relate to the vowel 'shwa' (e-muet). From the rule of Closed Syllable Adjustment (which relates shwa and [ε]), it is concluded that French phonology must be described in terms of representations making explicit provision for syllabic, as well as segmental, structure. The formal representation of syllable structure is discussed, and a concrete proposal is made. On this basis, it is suggested that the vowel shwa should be regarded as a phonological syllabic nucleus unfilled by any phonetic content in underlying structure-analogous to 'empty nodes' in syntax. It is shown that this representation provides a natural treatment of the facts of vowel alternation and elision that have been problematic for previous accounts of shwa. A particular advantage of this analysis is the resulting description of 'h-aspiré' words: these can be characterized as vowel-initial words that are exceptions to a single general schema of 'enchaînement'. Implications for other areas of French phonology, including the treatment of nasal vowels, are also suggested.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
534
    534
  • Thumbnail: Page 
535
    535
  • Thumbnail: Page 
536
    536
  • Thumbnail: Page 
537
    537
  • Thumbnail: Page 
538
    538
  • Thumbnail: Page 
539
    539
  • Thumbnail: Page 
540
    540
  • Thumbnail: Page 
541
    541
  • Thumbnail: Page 
542
    542
  • Thumbnail: Page 
543
    543
  • Thumbnail: Page 
544
    544
  • Thumbnail: Page 
545
    545
  • Thumbnail: Page 
546
    546
  • Thumbnail: Page 
547
    547
  • Thumbnail: Page 
548
    548
  • Thumbnail: Page 
549
    549
  • Thumbnail: Page 
550
    550
  • Thumbnail: Page 
551
    551
  • Thumbnail: Page 
552
    552
  • Thumbnail: Page 
553
    553
  • Thumbnail: Page 
554
    554
  • Thumbnail: Page 
555
    555
  • Thumbnail: Page 
556
    556
  • Thumbnail: Page 
557
    557
  • Thumbnail: Page 
558
    558
  • Thumbnail: Page 
559
    559
  • Thumbnail: Page 
560
    560
  • Thumbnail: Page 
561
    561
  • Thumbnail: Page 
562
    562
  • Thumbnail: Page 
563
    563
  • Thumbnail: Page 
564
    564
  • Thumbnail: Page 
565
    565
  • Thumbnail: Page 
566
    566
  • Thumbnail: Page 
567
    567
  • Thumbnail: Page 
568
    568
  • Thumbnail: Page 
569
    569
  • Thumbnail: Page 
570
    570
  • Thumbnail: Page 
571
    571
  • Thumbnail: Page 
572
    572
  • Thumbnail: Page 
573
    573