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Hazards in the Bog: Real and Imagined

Dianne Meredith
Geographical Review
Vol. 92, No. 3 (Jul., 2002), pp. 319-332
DOI: 10.2307/4140913
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4140913
Page Count: 14
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Hazards in the Bog: Real and Imagined
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Abstract

A rich body of geographical lore, much of it related to real or imaginary hazards, characterizes perceptions of bog landscapes. Bog bursts, will-o'-the-wisps, carnivorous plants, weird creatures, and perceptions of the "bottomless" bog all play a part in the folklore of the landscapes. Ambiguity about the features of bog landscapes is further heightened by the descriptive terminology employed by tale tellers, who present to us a world inhabited by meanings that go beyond the physical environment and touch on the primordial inner landscape.

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