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Non-Native Species Impacts on Pond Occupancy by an Anuran

MICHAEL J. ADAMS, CHRISTOPHER A. PEARL, STEPHANIE GALVAN and BROME MCCREARY
The Journal of Wildlife Management
Vol. 75, No. 1 (January 2011), pp. 30-35
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41418001
Page Count: 6
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Abstract

Non-native fish and bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus) are frequently cited as contributing to the decline of ranid frogs in the western United States, so we hypothesized that non-native species, habitat, or a combination of these relate to the probability of local extinction for northern red-legged frogs (Rana aurora) in Oregon, USA. We also hypothesized that the probability of colonization relates to land use, wetland size, or riparian forest. In a 5-yr study, we found no support for an effect of non-native species on northern red-legged frogs. Instead, probability of local extinction decreased with the extent of emergent vegetation and riparian forest. This finding suggests that managers consider the role of habitat when confronting non-native species problems.

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