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DETERMINANTS OF INFANT AND CHILD MORTALITY IN INDIA

RAVINDRA G. AMONKER and GARY D. BRINKER
International Review of Modern Sociology
Vol. 27, No. 2 (Autumn 1997), pp. 1-22
Published by: International Journals
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41421127
Page Count: 22
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DETERMINANTS OF INFANT AND CHILD MORTALITY IN INDIA
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Abstract

This study investigates the relationship between the level ofsocioeconomic development and infant and child mortality in India. The perspective of this study is based on the "Theory of Demographic Transition" which states that improved standard of living, changes in nutrition, sanitary reforms, improved public health programs, and technological and medical advances bring down the level of mortality. The study tests the following major hypothesis: The higher the level of scoioeconomic development, the lower the infant and child mortality rates among the states of India. The study applies correlation and multiple regression analysis to data collected by the National Family Health Survey 1992-1993, one of the most comprehensive surveys of its kind ever conducted in India by the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. The findings support the theory of demographic transition in large measure revealing twenty-two of the twenty-three socioeconomic development variables in the predicted direction with respect to infant mortality, and all twentythree variables in the predicted direction in regard to child mortality. Finally, the study suggests that higher levels of population literacy, education of women, urbanization, and child immunizations, and lower level of underweight children under four years lead to infant and child mortality decline.

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