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CARL JUNG, FEMINISM, AND MODERN STRUCTURAL REALITIES

VALESKA C. STUPAK and RONALD J. STUPAK
International Review of Modern Sociology
Vol. 20, No. 2 (Autumn 1990), pp. 267-276
Published by: International Journals
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41421571
Page Count: 10
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CARL JUNG, FEMINISM, AND MODERN STRUCTURAL
                            REALITIES
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Abstract

Carl Jung addresses the opposites of male and Female , masculine and feminine, in a unique and intriguing way. He reasons that within the collective unconscious (that part of the unconscious that is inherited and identical in all humans) of both males and females there lies an element of the opposite sex. Hence, all males harbor a feminine element known as the anima, and all females retain a masculine element known as the animus. At the core of the masculine element is rationality which produces a character effective in argumentation, rational and logical matters and inclined towards dealing with objects and abstractions. Jung considers the anima and the female consciousness to be governed by emotions and more subjective qualities, namely feeling or intuitions. The contemporary literature on organizational development also tends to support Jung by emphasizing the need to integrate feeling and relationship values into the workplace in order to counter rational one-sideness and imbalance and to boost effectiveness and efficiency. Perhaps in realizing the repression of the feeling and intuitive functions and by trying to convince people of their importance and facilitate their actualization in Western society, Jung is sometimes carried away by his own ideas and enthusiasm. However, he, nevertheless, maintains a credible feminist stance and deserves great credit for introducing feminine symbols into religion, psychology, family structures, organizational frameworks, and political discourse.

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