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DEMOGRAPHIC STRUCTURE OF CALIFORNIA BLACK WALNUT (JUGLANS CALIFORNICA; JUGLANDACEAE) WOODLANDS IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

Jon E. Keeley
Madroño
Vol. 37, No. 4 (OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1990), pp. 237-248
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41424819
Page Count: 12
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
DEMOGRAPHIC STRUCTURE OF CALIFORNIA BLACK WALNUT (JUGLANS CALIFORNICA; JUGLANDACEAE) WOODLANDS IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
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Abstract

Three woodlands dominated by California black walnut were studied. At one site, Quercus agrifolio, was a co-dominant whereas at the other two sites Juglans californica dominated > 90% of the relative areal coverage. Heteromeles arbutifolia was a significant component of all three woodlands. At two of the sites most of the walnuts were single-stemmed and some of them exceeded 15 m in height. Another site was a more open savanna type woodland and many trees had multiple stems; 40% had 4 or more stems per plant and one had 16 stems. The age structure of the three Juglans populations is presented. At all sites there were stems at least 70 years of age. All populations had substantial seedling recruitment and densities ranged from 275 to 1975 seedlings (defined as stems < 5 years of age and not attached to a mature tree) per hectare. It is hypothesized that irregularities in annual seedling establishment and seedling mortality play an important role in structuring these populations.

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