Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

BRODIAEA SANTAROSAE (THEMIDACEAE), A NEW RARE SPECIES FROM THE SANTA ROSA BASALT AREA OF THE SANTA ANA MOUNTAINS OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

Tom Chester, Wayne Armstrong and Kay Madore
Madroño
Vol. 54, No. 2 (APRIL-JUNE 2007), pp. 187-198
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41425703
Page Count: 12
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
BRODIAEA SANTAROSAE (THEMIDACEAE), A NEW RARE SPECIES FROM THE SANTA ROSA BASALT AREA OF THE SANTA ANA MOUNTAINS OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
Preview not available

Abstract

Brodiaea santarosae (Themidaceae) is a new species from southwest Riverside County and immediately-adjacent Miller Mountain of San Diego County, CA. It is easily distinguished from other Brodiaea species in southern California by its large flowers and distinctive, variable staminodes; morphological analysis revealed 11 total differentiating characteristics. Brodiaea santarosae occurs only on or very close to the 8-11 million-year-old Santa Rosa Basalt. It has the smallest range of the southern California Brodiaeas, with just four known populations occupying only a small portion of a ~ 40 km² area, plus a fifth small population disjunct by 11 km. It has been speculated that the B. santarosae population is a hybrid swarm between B. filifolia and B. orcuttii, based solely on the appearance of the staminodes and filaments in selected flowers. This speculation was rejected due to the lack of sympatry between the three taxa and because specimens of B. santarosae have numerous characteristics that are not intermediate between the claimed parent taxa. In contrast, intermediate characteristics were seen in Fl specimens of B. filifolia X B. orcuttii discovered in San Marcos, CA, the only location where those species overlap. We also report extensions to the length characteristics for both B. filifolia and B. orcuttii and demonstrate that two populations of B. filifolia previously thought to be hybrids are consistent with other B. filifolia populations. Brodiaea santarosae (Themidaceae) es una nueva especie del sudoeste del Condado de Riverside y del monte Miller inmediato-adyacente en el Condado de San Diego, CA. Es distinguido fácilmente de las otras especies de Brodiaea del Sur de California por sus flores grandes y staminodes variables y distintivos; el análisis morfológico reveló 11 totales que distinguen características. Brodiaea santarosae ocurre solamente en o muy cerca del Santa Rosa Basalt de 8-11 millones de años de antigüedad. Tiene la gama más pequeña de las Brodiaeas del Sur de California, con apenas cuatro poblaciones conocidas ocupando solamente una porción pequeña de un área de ~ 40 km² , más una quinto población pequeña disjunta por 11 kilómetros. Se ha especulado que la población de B. santarosae es un enjambre híbrido entre B. filifolia y B.orcuttii, basados solamente en el aspecto de los staminodes y de los filamentos en flores seleccionadas.Esta especulación fue rechazada debido a la carencia de sympatry entre los tres taxa y porque los especímenes de B. santarosae tienen características numerosas que no sean intermedias entre los taxa demandados del padre. En contraste, las características intermedias fueron consideradas en los especímenes Fl del B. filifolia X B. orcuttii descubierto en San Marcos, CA, la única localización donde esas especies se traslapan.También divulgamos extensiones a las características de la longitud para B. filifolia y B. orcuttii y demostramos que dos poblaciones del B. filifolia pensaron previamente para ser híbridos son constantes con otras poblaciones del B. filifolia.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[187]
    [187]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
188
    188
  • Thumbnail: Page 
189
    189
  • Thumbnail: Page 
190
    190
  • Thumbnail: Page 
191
    191
  • Thumbnail: Page 
192
    192
  • Thumbnail: Page 
193
    193
  • Thumbnail: Page 
194
    194
  • Thumbnail: Page 
195
    195
  • Thumbnail: Page 
196
    196
  • Thumbnail: Page 
197
    197
  • Thumbnail: Page 
198
    198