Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Altitudinal and Climatic Adaptation Is Mediated by Flowering Traits and FRI, FLC, and PHYC Genes in Arabidopsis

Belén Méndez-Vigo, F. Xavier Picó, Mercedes Ramiro, José M. Martínez-Zapater and Carlos Alonso-Blanco
Plant Physiology
Vol. 157, No. 4 (December 2011), pp. 1942-1955
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41435641
Page Count: 14
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Altitudinal and Climatic Adaptation Is Mediated by Flowering Traits and FRI, FLC, and PHYC Genes in Arabidopsis
Preview not available

Abstract

Extensive natural variation has been described for the timing of flowering initiation in many annual plants, including the model wild species Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which is presumed to be involved in adaptation to different climates. However, the environmental factors that might shape this genetic variation, as well as the molecular bases of climatic adaptation by modifications of flowering time, remain mostly unknown. To approach both goals, we characterized the flowering behavior in relation to vernalization of 182 Arabidopsis wild genotypes collected in a native region spanning a broad climatic range. Phenotype-environment association analyses identified strong altitudinal clines (0-2600 m) in seven out of nine flowering-related traits. Altitudinal clines were dissected in terms of minimum winter temperature and precipitation, indicating that these are the main climatic factors that might act as selective pressures on flowering traits. In addition, we used an association analysis approach with four candidate genes, FRIGIDA (FRI), FLOWERING LOCUS (FLC), PHYTOCHROME low frequency accounted for up to 16% of the variation for most traits. Furthermore, an FLC allelic series of six novel putative loss-and change-of-function alleles, with low to moderate frequency, revealed that a broader FLC functional diversification might contribute to flowering variation. Finally, environment-genotype association analyses showed that the spatial patterns of FRJ, FLC, and PHYC polymorphisms are significantly associated with winter temperatures and spring and winter precipitations, respectively. These results support that allelic variation in these genes is involved in climatic adaptation.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1942
    1942
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1943
    1943
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1944
    1944
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1945
    1945
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1946
    1946
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1947
    1947
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1948
    1948
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1949
    1949
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1950
    1950
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1951
    1951
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1952
    1952
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1953
    1953
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1954
    1954
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1955
    1955