Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Self Control, Fatalism, and Health in Appalachia

Wendy Welch
Journal of Appalachian Studies
Vol. 17, No. 1/2 (Spring/Fall 2011), pp. 108-122
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41446937
Page Count: 15
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Self Control, Fatalism, and Health in Appalachia
Preview not available

Abstract

How does fatalism affect the ways in which medical professionals view Appalachians' interest in their own health? Via a literature review, this concept is explored to reveal various ways in which fatalism can shift its meaning along a continuum from abdication of all self-efficacy to a complex interaction of environment, economics, belief, and abdication.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
108
    108
  • Thumbnail: Page 
109
    109
  • Thumbnail: Page 
110
    110
  • Thumbnail: Page 
111
    111
  • Thumbnail: Page 
112
    112
  • Thumbnail: Page 
113
    113
  • Thumbnail: Page 
114
    114
  • Thumbnail: Page 
115
    115
  • Thumbnail: Page 
116
    116
  • Thumbnail: Page 
117
    117
  • Thumbnail: Page 
118
    118
  • Thumbnail: Page 
119
    119
  • Thumbnail: Page 
120
    120
  • Thumbnail: Page 
121
    121
  • Thumbnail: Page 
122
    122