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Effect of Interregional Migration on Geographic Variability in Biological and Social Traits in Great Britain

C.G.N. MASCIE-TAYLOR and G.W. LASKER
Human Biology
Vol. 67, No. 4 (August 1995), pp. 629-640
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41465412
Page Count: 12
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Effect of Interregional Migration on Geographic Variability in Biological and Social Traits in Great Britain
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Abstract

Over 19% of individuals born in England, Scotland, and Wales during March 3-9, 1958, resided in 1981 in a region different from the region of their birth. This internal migration among the 11 regions increased geographic homogeneity for one genetic variable (ABO blood group). Cramer's V for mother's A, O, and B or AB blood group decreased from 0.0504 to 0.0476. Mother's Rh+/- blood group was not significantly different among regions of place of birth or subsequent place of residence of the offspring. Variability among the regions increased by migration from region of birth to region of residence 23 years later for the social class of male head of household (Cramer's V increased from 0.0815 to 0.0877) and for years of schooling completed (V increased from 0.107 to 0.129). Stature behaved more like the social variables (mean square deviation among regions increased from 371 cm² to 481 cm² in females and from 426 cm² to 471 cm² in males), but body weight tended to become more uniform among regions (mean square deviation decreased from 220 kg² to 178 kg² in females and from 315 kg² to 260 kg² in males).

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