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An Empirical Evaluation of Training Using Multi-attribute Utility Analysis

José M. Carretero-Gómez and Elizabeth F. Cabrera
Journal of Business and Psychology
Vol. 27, No. 2 (June 2012), pp. 223-241
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41474919
Page Count: 19
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An Empirical Evaluation of Training Using Multi-attribute Utility Analysis
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Abstract

Purpose This paper aims to develop and apply a multiattribute utility analysis model (MAU) to assess the benefits of HRM interventions as an alternative to the traditional utility analysis method. Design/Methodology/Approach MAU adopts a cost-benefit multi-variant approach to assess HRM efficiency using a non-monetary metric. The study employs a quasi-experimental design to examine the training effects on job performance, comparing pre-and post-intervention measures mostly from sub-groups of random sample of 367 trainees. Findings We showed that is feasible to adopt a multiattribute evaluation approach in HRM area by adapting the MAUT technique. Our formal MAU model also demonstrated that it is possible to adopt a broader and more global evaluation approach than other more "myopic" models such as traditional UA models. Results after applying our MAU model in a real organization indicated considerable utility from training employees. Implications The commitment and involvement of the organization in the evaluation project seem to suggest an interest in comprehensive evaluative models for HRM such as MAU. Because the amount of information that MAU model entails, it may be also used as a strategic instrument for continuous improving of HR interventions and as a mechanism to analyze the evaluation policy of different stakeholders groups. Originality/Value We provide a theoretical development of a MAU model and offer its first empirical application in a firm to calculate the utility of training. This contributes to utility analysis research and provides a guide for practitioners evaluating HRM benefits.

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