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Phylogeny and beyond: Scientific, historical, and conceptual significance of the first tree of life

Norman R. Pace, Jan Sapp and Nigel Goldenfeld
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 109, No. 4 (January 24, 2012), pp. 1011-1018
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41477190
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Phylogeny and beyond: Scientific, historical, and conceptual significance of the first tree of life
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Abstract

In 1977, Carl Woese and George Fox published a brief paper in PNAS that established, for the first time, that the overall phylogenetic structure of the living world is tripartite. We describe the way in which this monumental discovery was made, its context within the historical development of evolutionary thought, and how it has impacted our understanding of the emergence of life and the characterization of the evolutionary process in its most general form.

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