Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

The Technical Style of Wallaga Pottery Making: An Ethnoarchaeological Study of Oromo Potters in Southwest Highland Ethiopia

Bula Sirika Wayessa
The African Archaeological Review
Vol. 28, No. 4 (December 2011), pp. 301-326
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41486782
Page Count: 26
  • Download ($43.95)
  • Cite this Item
The Technical Style of Wallaga Pottery Making: An Ethnoarchaeological Study of Oromo Potters in Southwest Highland Ethiopia
Preview not available

Abstract

Pottery making is still practiced widely in parts of Ethiopia but variations in its technical practices are poorly documented. This study presents an ethnoarchaeological investigation of the technical style of pottery making among the Oromo of western Wallaga, located in the highlands of southwestern Ethiopia. The Oromo are a Cushiticspeaking people who occupied Wallaga as part of a massive expansion that occurred between the early sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. This resulted in the Oromo settling among Omotic and Nilo-Saharan peoples in Wallaga. Oromo pottery production in the region is passed down through family lines, and these potters use specific technical styles, which are distinct in material properties and production processes from the surrounding non-Oromo communities. Documentation of the technical styles of contemporary potter communities provides a material means for archaeologists to investigate the history and interaction of social groups in the past. Specifically, this study is relevant to investigating the poorly documented history of the Oromo expansion. La poterie demeure pratiquée de manière courante dans plusieurs parties de l'Ethiopie mais les variations techniques de cette pratique sont peu documentées. Cet article présente une approche ethnoarchéologique du style et des techniques céramiques chez les peuples Oromo du Wallaga occidental (pays montagneux du Sud-Ouest de l'Ethiopie). Les Oromos, qui parlent une langue cushite, se sont établis dans la région du Wallaga pendant les grandes migrations des 16ème et 17ème siècles. Les Oromos sont donc installés parmi les peuples de souche omotique et nilo-sahariens du Wallaga. Les familles oromos se transmettent l'art de la poterie de génération en génération, et leur style très frappant est distinct de celui des communautés non-Oromos. La documentation du style et des techniques de la poterie contemporaine offrent des indices matériels qui permettent aux archéologues d'enquêter sur l'histoire et les interactions entre les groupes sociaux qui ont peuplé le Wallaga. La présente étude est donc pertinente à la compréhension de l'histoire de l'expansion des Oromos, qui reste très peu documentée.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[301]
    [301]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
302
    302
  • Thumbnail: Page 
303
    303
  • Thumbnail: Page 
304
    304
  • Thumbnail: Page 
305
    305
  • Thumbnail: Page 
306
    306
  • Thumbnail: Page 
307
    307
  • Thumbnail: Page 
308
    308
  • Thumbnail: Page 
309
    309
  • Thumbnail: Page 
310
    310
  • Thumbnail: Page 
311
    311
  • Thumbnail: Page 
312
    312
  • Thumbnail: Page 
313
    313
  • Thumbnail: Page 
314
    314
  • Thumbnail: Page 
315
    315
  • Thumbnail: Page 
316
    316
  • Thumbnail: Page 
317
    317
  • Thumbnail: Page 
318
    318
  • Thumbnail: Page 
319
    319
  • Thumbnail: Page 
320
    320
  • Thumbnail: Page 
321
    321
  • Thumbnail: Page 
322
    322
  • Thumbnail: Page 
323
    323
  • Thumbnail: Page 
324
    324
  • Thumbnail: Page 
325
    325
  • Thumbnail: Page 
326
    326