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Effects of permanent magnetic fields on in vitro growth of Cymbidium and Spathiphyllum shoots

Pham Thanh Van, Jaime A. Teixeira da Silva, Le Huy Ham and Michio Tanaka
In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology. Plant
Vol. 48, No. 2 (March/April 2012), pp. 225-232
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41496513
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Effects of permanent magnetic fields on in vitro growth of Cymbidium and Spathiphyllum shoots
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Abstract

Magnetic fields affect biological systems. However, this is the first study on the effects of permanent magnetic fields (MFs) on the micropropagation of two ornamental plants, Spathiphyllum cv. i.e 'Merry' and Cymbidium Music Hour 'Maria'. Cymbidium and Spathiphyllum shoots cultured in the ' Miracle Pack' ® culture system were exposed to MFs of different intensities, polarities, and duration of exposure. The results show that by increasing intensity from 5 x 10⁻v Tesla (T) as the geo-magnetic field to 0.1, 0.15, and 0.2 T negatively influenced height and fresh mass of roots of Cymbidium plants (except for 0.1 T-S and 0.2 T-N treatments), but had no significant effect on other plantlet parameters. Long-term exposure (1, 2, or 3 mo) of Cymbidium shoots to 0.15 T-MFs negatively influenced plant height, positively affected the number of leaves (with the exception of 0.15 T-S—I mo), and had no clear effect on other parameters compared to the control. MFs (0.1, 0.15, and 0.2 T), regardless of their polarity, increased chlorophyll content (SPAD value) and the number of leaves, but slightly decreased the dry mass of Spathiphyllum shoots. Different exposure duration to 0.15 T (i.e., 2, 4, or 8 wk) had no significant influence on Spathiphyllum plantlet development other than increasing the SPAD value. These two ornamentals could serve as model systems to study plant development, space production, yield maximization, and the development of new morphotypes essential for the floricultural market.

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