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Farm Size and Productivity Revisited: Some Notes from Recent Experience of Punjab

G K Chadha
Economic and Political Weekly
Vol. 13, No. 39 (September 30, 1978), pp. A87-A96
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41497101
Page Count: 10
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Farm Size and Productivity Revisited: Some Notes from Recent Experience of Punjab
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Abstract

On the basis primarily of farm management data a number of economists have come to conclusions about the relationship between farm size and productivity. While a majority of them have seen an inverse relationship? between the two and offered a variety of explanations for this, a few have felt that this generalisation cannot hold for all-India. The Green Revolution in the late sixties, by increasing the component of capital inputs, may have made a difference to the earlier conclusions. This paper, therefore, looks into the changing structure of capital and its effect on resource productivity. Punjab is chosen to study these effects, because it has a predominantly owner-cultivated agrarian structure and also has data from the earlier farm level studies. The analysis suggests that factors which drive small fanners towards more intensive cultivation, if combined with wherewithal that further permit them to do so, can help small farmers compete with large farmers in all aspects of production technology — except in investment on size-biased machinery and implements for which farm-size alone is the constraint. Clearly, the long-abandoned co-operative network is best suited to make up for the input deficiencies and give small farmers the competitive base they need in Indian agriculture.

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