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Variation of West Nile Virus Antibody Prevalence in Migrating and Wintering Hawks in Central California

Joshua Hull, Angus Hull, William Reisen, Ying Fang and Holly Ernest
The Condor
Vol. 108, No. 2 (May, 2006), pp. 435-439
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4151029
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Variation of West Nile Virus Antibody Prevalence in Migrating and Wintering Hawks in Central California
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Abstract

To assess the extent of West Nile virus (WNV) exposure of migrating (Marin Headlands) and wintering (Central Valley) hawks in California, plasma from 271 Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), 19 Red-shouldered Hawks (B. lineatus), and 30 Cooper's Hawks (Accipiter cooperii) was tested for WNV antibodies during the winter of 2004-2005. WNV antibodies were found in of migrating and 15 of wintering Red-tailed Hawks, 20 of migrating and 58 of wintering Red-shouldered Hawks, and 13 of migrating Cooper's Hawks. No individuals demonstrated visible signs of WNV illness. Red-tailed Hawks that tested positive for WNV antibodies displayed no difference from Red-tailed Hawks without WNV antibodies in weight to wing chord ratio or white blood cell counts. In the Central Valley, WNV antibodies were significantly more prevalent in Red-shouldered Hawks than in Redtailed Hawks. Significantly more Red-tailed Hawks sampled on wintering grounds tested positíve for WNV antibodies than Red-tailed Hawks sampled during migration. /// Con el fin de determinar el grado de expositión al virus del Nilo occidental (VNO) de halcones migratorios (en los Cabos de Marín) y halcones invernales en California (Valle Central), se analizaron plasma de 271 Buteo jamaicensis, 19 Buteo lineatus y 30 Accipiter cooperii para encontrar anticuerpos del VNO durante el invierno de 2004-2005. Se encontraron anticuerpos del VNO en el 5% de los individuos migratorios y en el 15% de los individuos invernales de B. jamaicensis, en el 20% de los individuos migratorios y en el 58% de los individuos invernales de B. lineatus y en el 13% de los individuos migratorios de A. cooperii. Ningún halcón mostró señales de la enfermedad del VNO. Los individuos de B. jamaicensis que resultaron positivos para anticuerpos del VNO no mostraron diferencias con los individuos de B. jamaicensis que no presentaron anticuerpos en el cociente entre el peso y el largo del ala o en el conteo sanguineo de glóbulos blancos. En el Valle Central, la prevalencia de los anticuerpos del VNO fue significativamente mayor en B. lineatus que en B. jamaicensis. El número de individuos de B. jamaicensis que resultaron positivos para anticuerpos del VNO fue significativamente mayor en los sitios de invernada que durante la migración.

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