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Mercenaries

Deborah Avant
Foreign Policy
No. 143 (Jul. - Aug., 2004), pp. 20-22+24+26+28
DOI: 10.2307/4152906
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4152906
Page Count: 6
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Mercenaries
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Abstract

"How is it in our nation's interest," asked U.S. Sen. Carl Levin recently, "to have civilian contractors, rather than military personnel, performing vital national security functions ... in a war zone?" The answer lies in humanity's long history of contracting force and the changing role of today's private security firms. Even as governments debate how to hold them accountable, these hired guns are rapidly becoming indispensable to national militaries, private corporations, and nongovernmental groups across the globe.

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