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Considerations in the Margin of "The Lore of the Land": A Review Article

EPHRAIM NISSAN
La Ricerca Folklorica
No. 63, Putting People First: Dialogo interculturale immaginando il futuro in Oceania (aprile 2011), pp. 145-158
Published by: Grafo Spa
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41548524
Page Count: 14
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Considerations in the Margin of "The Lore of the Land": A Review Article
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Abstract

Lore of the Land recently joined the Gotha of classics on English folklore, along with A Dictionary of English Folklore and A Dictionary ofSuperstitions, each in their respective niche. In this review article, we provide a commentary on select topics, in a comparative perspective: the giant Gurgunt vs. the Gargantua of Rabelais; the fabled submerged city of Lyonnesse in relation to submerged cities in England and elsewhere (e.g., the fabled city of Garda in Italy); chambers lit by a gem in English lore in relation to lore on Roman antiquities, and to Jewish lore on the Ark of Noah; the Great Bed of Ware vs. the biblical bed of King Og; lore on architects falling from the top of their monuments (Great Yarmouth, vs. Milan); The 'African' Saxon leader Gormund (in abbot Alexander Neckham's account of the siege of Cirencester), vs. the 'Indians' landing in Gaul in the 60s BCE according to Pomponius Mela and Pliny; demonic dogs, and Abraham Ibn Ezra's death in England; red flowers and the blood of the fallen; raped kings (such as Edward II); the caudatus Anglicus myth; racist discourse in folklore; and finally, the unusual meeting of English and Jewish lore in a newspapers ghost story.

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