Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Europa und Amerika: zwei Welten

Corrado Gini and Agostino de Vita
Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv
52. Bd., H. 1 (Jul., 1940), pp. 1-37
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41553150
Page Count: 37
  • Download ($43.95)
  • Cite this Item
Europa und Amerika: zwei Welten
Preview not available

Abstract

The author, who has been to the U. S. A. as well as to other regions of North, Central and South America seven times, gives a new interpretation of American life in this article. He takes as starting-point for his examination the fact that the American nation in its vast majority originates from the European working-classes, whose way of thinking and whose habits it has really retained and adapted to the exceedingly favourable conditions of the new environments, and further developed. Thus a new psychology of work is formed, in which work is no longer regarded as a sacrifice but as a necessity. This is a fact of great social significance, which amongst other things results in modifying the bitterness of class-warfare and on the other hand in a greater importance of woman, to whom in American society many of the functions are entrusted, which in Europe are performed by men of the higher social classes. The author also shows how many of the more or less insignificant usages of the European workingclasses, when the latter came to settle in America, were transformed into national customs and then, refined and consecrated by fashion, have sometimes come back to Europe to be adopted there as the last word in elegance. The main part of the article consists of an examination of the great economic significance which immigration has had for American life. In his very thorough statement of the facts the author shows that the total of the present national wealth in the U. S. A. is less than the capitalised sums of money at a modest rate of interest — representing the value of the immigrants —, which thanks to immigration have enabled the American nation to save in the course of rearing the new generation, and which amount to less than the corresponding net proceeds after a discount, which the immigrants have realised later. On the other hand the intellectual initiative, the openmindedness, the moral freshness and the solidarity which characterise the American nation are unique and place this nation in the foremost ranks and often at the head of progress in the cause of civilisation. The author sees the reason for this in the fact that the European working-classes, from which the American nation originates, are less subjected to the influence of a tradition of a thousand years standing, which represents the debt which the Caucasian peoples have paid for the culture which they created. He draws a parallel between the U. S. A. and greater Greece and raises the question whether American culture, as is the case with the culture of greater Greece, could not be regarded as representing a meteor in the history of human progress.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[1]
    [1]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2
    2
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3
    3
  • Thumbnail: Page 
4
    4
  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12
    12
  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14
  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18
  • Thumbnail: Page 
19
    19
  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20
  • Thumbnail: Page 
21
    21
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23
  • Thumbnail: Page 
24
    24
  • Thumbnail: Page 
25
    25
  • Thumbnail: Page 
26
    26
  • Thumbnail: Page 
27
    27
  • Thumbnail: Page 
28
    28
  • Thumbnail: Page 
29
    29
  • Thumbnail: Page 
30
    30
  • Thumbnail: Page 
31
    31
  • Thumbnail: Page 
32
    32
  • Thumbnail: Page 
33
    33
  • Thumbnail: Page 
34
    34
  • Thumbnail: Page 
35
    35
  • Thumbnail: Page 
36
    36
  • Thumbnail: Page 
37
    37