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LES UNITÉS GRAPHIQUES DU FRANÇAIS MÉDIÉVAL : MOTS ET SYNTAGMES, DES REPRÉSENTATIONS MOUVANTES ET PROBLÉMATIQUES

Nelly Andrieux-Reix and Simone Monsonégo
Langue Française
No. 119, Segments graphiques du français: Pratiques et normalisations dans l'histoire (SEPTEMBRE 1998), pp. 30-51
Published by: Armand Colin
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41559355
Page Count: 22
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
LES UNITÉS GRAPHIQUES DU FRANÇAIS MÉDIÉVAL : MOTS ET SYNTAGMES, DES REPRÉSENTATIONS MOUVANTES ET PROBLÉMATIQUES
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Abstract

The term « sequences » is used to designate the graphic segments formed by the joining together, in writing, of grammatical and lexical elements which could just as well be written separately. Some of these sequences correspond to phraseunits ; others go beyond the limits of the phrase. Throughout the history of writing in the Middle Ages, various recurrent types of morpho-syntactic sequences can be found. Their origins may partly be explained by the Latin grammatical model, which was the only such model that was formally taught, and the only one that had any authority. It seems likely that the first attempts at codifying the spelling and the morphology of the vernacular had little effect on the use of these sequence-types ; similarly, the increasing progress of lexical awareness that can be seen from the 14th century onwards does not seem to have made these uses appear contrary to grammatical correctness : indeed, their persistence is probably due to the « normalising » effect of continued usage.

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