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The Systematic Position of the Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) as Indicated by Its Nasal Mites (Acarina: Dermanyssidae, Rhinonyssinae)

Danny B. Pence and Stanley D. Casto
The Wilson Bulletin
Vol. 87, No. 1 (Mar., 1975), pp. 75-82
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4160577
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Systematic Position of the Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) as Indicated by Its Nasal Mites (Acarina: Dermanyssidae, Rhinonyssinae)
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Abstract

The rhinonyssine nasal mite literature was surveyed for records of infection of the Mimidae, Turdidae, and related groups and these data were evaluated with respect to the systematic position of the Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis). The Gray Catbird harbors Sternostoma dumetellae, a species not recorded from other mimids but closely related to S. technaui and S. spathulatum which are recorded from the Turdidae and Cinclidae. Sternostoma kelloggi from the Gray Catbird, Brown Thrasher, and Mocking-bird is a distinct species but again closely related to S. hutsoni, S. siaphilus, and S. dureni from the New and Old World Turdidae. Ptilonyssus euroturdi from the Gray Catbird is also found in a number of turdids in both the New and Old World. Thus, the parasite evidence suggests that the Gray Catbird has affinities with both the Mimidae and Turdidae. The occurrence of Sternostoma technaui in the Mimidae, Turdidae, and Cinclidae also suggests relationship among these families.

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