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Habitat Use by the Blackpoll Warbler

Douglass H. Morse
The Wilson Bulletin
Vol. 91, No. 2 (Jun., 1979), pp. 234-243
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4161203
Page Count: 10
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Habitat Use by the Blackpoll Warbler
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Abstract

Foraging patterns of Blackpoll Warblers were studied on their breeding grounds in mountain fir forests of New Hampshire and during migration in Maryland and Maine. Populations were also censused at several altitudes in New Hampshire. Blackpoll Warblers spent most of their time foraging on inner parts of vegetation at medium heights, although their placement in deciduous trees was more peripheral than that in conifers, probably a result of differences in the distribution of foliage. Blackpoll Warblers were the commonest species of bird in mountaintop fir forests, but their density there was lower than that found in some mixed coniferous-deciduous, second-growth areas on the mountainsides. They showed the widest altitudinal gradient of any warbler and a wider one than any other passerine except the Dark-eyed Junco. Blackpoll Warblers forage very similarly to Bay-breasted Warblers, and only 1 of the 2 appears to breed at most sites. I suggest that their habitat use patterns are so similar that they cannot coexist under most circumstances.

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