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Comparative Habitat Use by Louisiana and Northern Waterthrushes

Robert J. Craig
The Wilson Bulletin
Vol. 97, No. 3 (Sep., 1985), pp. 347-355
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4162107
Page Count: 9
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Comparative Habitat Use by Louisiana and Northern Waterthrushes
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Abstract

Habitat use by the Louisiana (Seiurus motacilla) and Northern (S. noveboracensis) waterthrushes was studied at Boston Hollow in northeastern Connecticut. Territories of Northern Waterthrushes had significantly greater shrub and tree density, more evergreen cover by moss, shrubs, and trees, and more swamp related features such as hummocks, ferns, and alders, but less fast-moving water than those of Louisiana Waterthrushes. Despite statistical differences, however, both species occupied a wide range of habitats and overlapped considerably in habitat use. The habitats at Boston Hollow seemed representative of the range of habitats used throughout Connecticut, but were more similar to those used at higher elevations. Both species coexisted without aggression even though they overlapped in habitat use and in territorial boundaries. Observed patterns of habitat use appear best explained in terms of independently evolved ecological requirements of each species.

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