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DUE CITTÀ PARALLELE: LA VARSAVIA CATTOLICA E QUELLA EBRAICA

Jacek Moskwa
La Rassegna Mensile di Israel
Vol. 71, No. 2/3 (MAGGIO - DICEMBRE 2005), pp. 87-92
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41621615
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
DUE CITTÀ PARALLELE: LA VARSAVIA CATTOLICA E QUELLA EBRAICA
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Abstract

Catholic Warsaw and Jewish Warsaw: separated cities in the same place. In the beginning of the 20th century Warsaw was the biggest Jewish city in Europe and the second biggest one – after New York City – in the world. At the same time and in the same place two different and almost completely separated communities existed side by side: a Catholic and a Jewish Warsaw. Isaac Singer's The Family Moskat is a very good example of this coexistence. The Polish journalist and writer Jacek Moskwa spent his youth in the neighbourhood of Warsaw named Praga – on the right side of the Vistula River – where part of the novel takes place. He describes streets and houses which looked as like a typical shtetl of Eastern Europe. But after the Shoah there are no Jews left, and their memory too was erased ...

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