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Structure, Seasonal Dynamics, and Habitat Relationships of Avian Communities in Small Even-Aged Forest Stands

Richard H. Yahner
The Wilson Bulletin
Vol. 98, No. 1 (Mar., 1986), pp. 61-82
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4162184
Page Count: 22
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Structure, Seasonal Dynamics, and Habitat Relationships of Avian Communities in Small Even-Aged Forest Stands
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Abstract

Structure, stability, and habitat relationships of avian communities associated with small even-aged stands were studied for three consecutive winters and breeding seasons in aspen (Populus spp.) and mixed-oak (Quercus spp.) cover type in an area managed for Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa umbellus) habitat. Thirteen and 69 species were noted in six habitat types during winter and the breeding season, respectively. Trunk-bark foragers predominated in winter, particularly in uncut habitats; in contrast, the ground-shrub foraging guild predominated in the breeding season, especially in clearcut habitats. The six habitat types were segreated in two groups (uncut and clearcut) on the basis of the stability of the trunk-bark and ground-shrub foraging guilds in winter and the breeding season, respectively. Black-capped Chickadees (Parus atricapillus) in winter and Rufous-sided Towhees (Pipilo erythrophthalmus) in the breeding season were the most abundant species. Habitat variables describing overstory trees and snags were among those important to trunk-bark and sallier-canopy foraging guilds; variables describing shrub and understory vegetation were associated with the ground-shrub foraging guild. The habitat fragmentation created by the current cutting cycle has had no discernible negative impact on the avifauna, and species adapted to early-successional habitats have benefited.

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