Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Measuring Malnutrition: Technical Problems and Ideological Perspectives

Philip Payne and Peter Cutler
Economic and Political Weekly
Vol. 19, No. 34 (Aug. 25, 1984), pp. 1485-1487, 1489-1491
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41625648
Page Count: 6
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($9.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Measuring Malnutrition: Technical Problems and Ideological Perspectives
Preview not available

Abstract

There is just now a particularly fierce and wide-ranging dispute about the nature and extent of malnutrition in the developing world. The conflictis only partly aboutthe statisticalbasis ofthe quantification of the malnourished. To a much greater extent it is due to the fact that the various opponents take their stands upon the basis of fundamentally different theoretical frameworks — often, it seems, without any consciousness of that fact. Like many other groups of natural scientists, nutritionists have been slow to assimilate the implications of the developments in the history and philosophy of science which, during the last decade or so, have indicated the connections between scientific theory and social ideology, and which have given insights into the nature of the processes through which théories are developed and tested. The purpose of this paper is to try to show that if we want to assess the current state of knowledge and controversy in nutrition, then it is as important to understand the nature of the social and political context within which any particular theory has arisen, as it is to judge the technical quality of the data and the criteria which have been used to test it.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1485
    1485
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1486
    1486
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1487
    1487
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1489
    1489
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1490
    1490
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1491
    1491