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DIE „GEOGRAPHISCHE UNIVERSAL-ZEIG UND SCHLAG-UHR“ VON JOHANN BAPTIST HOMANN UND DIE KLEINEN GLOBEN VON SICHELBARTH UND DOPPELMAYR ALS WICHTIGE BESTANDTEILE ASTRONOMISCHER UHREN DES 18. JAHRHUNDERTS

Wolfram Dolz
Der Globusfreund
Nr. 51/52 (2005 (für 2003/2004)), pp. 33-45
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41628651
Page Count: 13
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
DIE „GEOGRAPHISCHE UNIVERSAL-ZEIG UND SCHLAG-UHR“ VON JOHANN BAPTIST HOMANN UND DIE KLEINEN GLOBEN VON SICHELBARTH UND DOPPELMAYR ALS WICHTIGE BESTANDTEILE ASTRONOMISCHER UHREN DES 18. JAHRHUNDERTS
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Abstract

The 300 th anniversary of the founding of the Nuremberg map publishing house of Johann Baptist Homann (1664-1724) is a good opportunity for discussing the globes produced by Homann and by Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr (1677-1750). Our main interest, however, are not their well-known free-standing globes, but those incorporated into 18th-century clocks and planetary machines: objects that have often been overlooked by map historians and globe connoisseurs. The Renaissance brought forth a number of outstanding globes in the context of mechanical models of the universe: among them are the planetary orbital clocks in Kassel (1561) and Dresden (1568) by Eberhard Baldewein, Hans Bucher and Hermann Diepel, as well as Philipp Imsser's astronomical clock (1555) in Vienna. Numerous models of the cosmos were built during the Enlightenment, and the monastic orders offered a setting in which theologians with mathematical or mechanical talent could pursue their interests. Homann's Geographische Universal-Zeig und Schlag-Uhr (1705) provided the basis for a series of similar globe clocks. Foremost among those who further developed Homann's ideas was the Jesuit priest Johannes Klein (1684-1762) in Prague. Klein's clocks as well as the planetary models following the tradition of the southern German Lutheran pastor Philipp Mathäus Hahn (1739-1790) are presented.

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