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DER ,JAGIELLONISCHE GLOBUS‘, UTOPIA UND ,JAVE LA GRANDE‘

Robert J. King
Der Globusfreund
Nr. 55/56 (2009 (für 2007/2008)), pp. 39-52
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41628688
Page Count: 14
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
DER ,JAGIELLONISCHE GLOBUS‘, UTOPIA UND ,JAVE LA GRANDE‘
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Abstract

Vincenzo Coronelli referred on his 1688 Terrestrial Globe to the uncertainty regarding the location of Marco Polo's Java Minor, noting that while in the opinion of some it could be identified with Sumatra, others believed it to be Sumbawa or New Holland. Java Minor was identified as an island by Jean Alfonse in his work of 1544, La Cosmographie, but Java Major was for him part of the continent of Terra Australis, which extended as far as the Antarctic Pole and the Strait of Magellan. This concept was exhibited in the mid-sixteenth century mappemondes of the school of cosmographers centred at Dieppe, Normandy, which in later times gave rise to the idea that Australia may have been discovered by Europeans long before the Dutch began to chart its coast in 1606 or before James Cook charted its East coast in 1770. A clue to resolving this puzzle is offered by the globe dating from around 1510 held by the Muzeum Uniwersytetu Jagiellonskiego Collegium Maius, Cracow, Poland. This globe depicts a continent in the Indian Ocean to the east of Africa and south of India, but labelled 'America noviter reperta' a duplicate of South America with Brazil. The Jagiellonian globe illustrates how geographers of the early sixteenth century struggled to reconcile the discoveries of new lands with orthodox Ptolemaic cosmography. It also offers a clue as to where Thomas More located his Utopia, and provides a cosmographie explanation for the 'Jave Ia Grande' of the Dieppe school.

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