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Body Mass and Carcass Composition of Fall Migrant Oldsquaws

James O. Leafloor, John E. Thompson and C. Davison Ankney
The Wilson Bulletin
Vol. 108, No. 3 (Sep., 1996), pp. 567-572
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4163724
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Body Mass and Carcass Composition of Fall Migrant Oldsquaws
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Abstract

We investigated body and organ mass and carcass composition of twentyseven migrant Oldsquaws (Clangula hyemalis) killed when they collided with power transmission lines in northeastern Ontario in October 1986. Comparison of the first principal component (PC1) from eight structural measurements indicated that adult male Oldsquaws were structurally larger than females; however, organ weights did not differ between sexes when PC1 was included as a covariate (ANCOVA, P > 0.05 in all cases). Carcass composition was similar to that reported for spring migrants. Ash-free lean dry weight (AFLDW) and ash were positively related to structural size, but did not differ between sexes when PC1 was included as a covariate. Lipids comprised 17.5% of whole body mass of females and 14.1% of males and were sufficient to fuel migration at least to the next likely staging area in the Great Lakes. Fall migrant Oldsquaws must have stored substantial lipid and protein reserves after breeding, suggesting that offshore feeding areas in James and Hudson Bay are critical.

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