Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Pairing Chronology and Agonistic Behaviors of Wintering Green-Winged Teal and Mallards

William P. Johnson and Frank C. Rohwer
The Wilson Bulletin
Vol. 110, No. 3 (Sep., 1998), pp. 311-315
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4163954
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Pairing Chronology and Agonistic Behaviors of Wintering Green-Winged Teal and Mallards
Preview not available

Abstract

We examined pairing chronology and aggressive interactions of Green-winged Teal (Anas crecca) and Mallards (A. platyrhynchos) wintering in coastal Louisiana from October 1994 through March 1995. Many Mallards were apparently paired upon their arrival to coastal Louisiana in early November, as 11 of the first 20 females observed were paired. Most (≥90%) female Mallards were paired by mid-December. Green-winged Teal were first observed pairing in January and 81% of females observed during March were paired. For both Green-winged Teal (P < 0.01) and Mallards (P < 0.01) intraspecific aggressive conflicts were primarily won by individuals initiating encounters. Paired Green-winged Teal (P < 0.05) and paired Mallards (P < 0.05) typically won conflicts with unpaired conspecifics. In agonistic encounters between unpaired male and unpaired female Green-winged Teal, neither sex was dominant (P > 0.05). The frequency of aggressive interactions by paired and unpaired Green-winged Teal was similar (P > 0.05); in contrast, paired Mallards were less likely to participate in aggressive interactions than were unpaired Mallards (P < 0.01). Effects of pairing on aggressive interactions do not appear to be the same for Green-winged Teal and Mallards.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
311
    311
  • Thumbnail: Page 
312
    312
  • Thumbnail: Page 
313
    313
  • Thumbnail: Page 
314
    314
  • Thumbnail: Page 
315
    315