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Vocalizations of the Blue-Fronted Amazon (Amazona aestiva) in the Chancaní Reserve, Córdoba, Argentina

Esteban Fernández-Juricic, Mónica B. Martella and Eugenia V. Alvarez
The Wilson Bulletin
Vol. 110, No. 3 (Sep., 1998), pp. 352-361
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4163959
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Vocalizations of the Blue-Fronted Amazon (Amazona aestiva) in the Chancaní Reserve, Córdoba, Argentina
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Abstract

The calls of the Blue-fronted Amazon (Amazona aestiva) are described and their possible function within the social organization of the species during breeding and non-breeding seasons are discussed. We identified 9 vocalizations; six ("wak-wak", "wa-wawawa", transitions, "gu-gugu", guturals, "ka-kaka") were nonspecific and were given in several circumstances: alarm, contact, feeding, and flying. The remaining had specific contexts: "waahh" (agonistic), "grr-uíp" (contact in flight), and songs (reproduction-territorial). Vocalization rates increased in alarm contexts and during the non-breeding season, probably as a result of increasing interactions between individuals. The frequency containing the greatest amount of energy was a useful variable to characterize Blue-fronted Amazon calls, particularly at the species level. The most commonly used vocalization, "wak-wak", has structural features that promote directionality and short-range transmission, enhancing its usefulness for the aggregation of individuals. It is suggested that songs were derived from a process of repetition and increasing variability from gutural calls. The highly contextual variability of these calls may be due to an incompletely specialized repertoire or a vocal system based upon combinations of calls for conveying messages.

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