Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Apollo at the wedding of Thetis and Peleus: Four problematic cases

Ioanna L. Hadjicosti
L'Antiquité Classique
T. 75 (2006), pp. 15-22
Published by: Antiquité Classique
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41665276
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Apollo at the wedding of Thetis and Peleus: Four problematic cases
Preview not available

Abstract

The wedding of Peleus and Thetis is one of the most celebrated stories in the tradition. It is always described as a happy occasion where the gods met and blessed the union of one of their kind to an exceptional mortal. In the tradition there are often many positive references to Achilles in the wedding scene, the child that was to be born from that union. However, although this is never explicitly said, Achilles is also the child that was to die at Troy after some years at the hands of Apollo, one of the most prominent guests at the wedding and indeed one that had a special relationship with Thetis. The problem is usually excluded from descriptions of the wedding. There are nevertheless few occasions where a poet alludes to the problem in a more or less direct way. This paper discusses four such cases. These include a hint in the Iliad, a direct accusation in Aeschylus fr. 350, an elaborate accusation in Quintus Book III and finally the absence of Apollo from the wedding scene in Catullus 64. Les noces de Pelée et de Thétis sont l'une des histoires les plus célèbres de la tradition. Elles sont toujours décrites comme une occasion heureuse où les dieux ont béni l'union d'une des leurs et d'un mortel exceptionnel. Cependant, bien que ceci ne soit jamais explicitement dit, Achille, l'enfant né de cette union, devait mourir à Troie après quelques années de la main même d'Apollon, l'un des invités éminents de la noce, qui entretenait une relation particulière avec Thétis. Le problème est généralement passé sous silence dans les descriptions de la noce, mais quatre auteurs y font toutefois allusion. Il s'agit d'une allusion dans l'Iliade (livre XXIV), d'une accusation directe chez Eschyle (fr. 350), d'une accusation subtile chez Quintus de Smyrne (livre III) et, finalement, de l'absence d'Apollon dans la scène de la noce chez Catulle (Carm. 64).

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[15]
    [15]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18
  • Thumbnail: Page 
19
    19
  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20
  • Thumbnail: Page 
21
    21
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22