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Priestesses of the Imperial Cult in the Latin West: Benefactions and Public Honour

Emily A. Hemelrijk
L'Antiquité Classique
T. 75 (2006), pp. 85-117
Published by: Antiquité Classique
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41665280
Page Count: 33
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Priestesses of the Imperial Cult in the Latin West: Benefactions and Public Honour
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Abstract

This article, which is a sequel to the article on "priestesses of the imperial cult in the Latin West: titles and function" in L'Antiquité Classique 74 (2005), p. 137-170, examines the possible connections between the priesthood, benefactions and public honour of priestesses of the imperial cult in the cities of Italy and the western provinces of the Roman Empire in the first three centuries AD. It is argued that the relation between their priesthood, civic generosity and public honour is both looser and more complex than is usually assumed. Poursuivant la recherche inaugurée par l'article sur les « prêtresses du culte impérial en Italie et les provinces occidentales de l'Empire romain : titres et fonction » publié dans L'Antiquité Classique 74 (2005), p. 137-170, cette étude examine les relations qui existaient entre la prêtrise du culte impérial, les bienfaits consentis par les prêtresses et les honneurs publics qui leur étaient conférés dans les cités d'Italie et dans les provinces occidentales de l'Empire romain aux trois premiers siècles de notre ère. On constate que ces relations étaient plus complexes qu'on ne l'imagine habituellement.

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