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Literary Loves as cycles: from Meleager to Ovid

Maria Ypsilanti
L'Antiquité Classique
T. 74 (2005), pp. 83-110
Published by: Antiquité Classique
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41666128
Page Count: 28
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Literary Loves as cycles: from Meleager to Ovid
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Abstract

The importance of Meleager for later Greek and Roman erotic poetry is well known. The present paper offers observations on the cyclical approach by Meleager in his poems on girls and boys and, within this, his pair-of-epigrams technique. A comparison with similar techniques in later Greek epigrams and Roman erotic poetry of the first century B.C. allows a greater appreciation of Meleager's importance and influence on later poets and reveals the manner and the extent to which his poetic works have inspired and constituted a guide for Latin love poetry. Les amours littéraires en cycles. De Méléagre à Ovide. L'importance de Méléagre pour la poésie erotique grecque et latine est bien connue. Cet article livre des observations sur le traitement cyclique de Méléagre dans ses poèmes sur des filles et des garçons, et sur sa technique des couples de poèmes. La comparaison avec des techniques semblables dans des épigrammes grecques plus tardives et dans la poésie romaine de l'âge d'or permet de mieux apprécier l'influence de Méléagre sur les poètes des siècles ultérieurs et montre comment et dans quelle mesure la poésie erotique de Rome a puisé à son programme poétique.

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