Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

GROUP WORK IN SOCIAL WORK EDUCATION: The Canadian Experience

Paule McNicoll and Jocelyn Lindsay
Canadian Social Work Review / Revue canadienne de service social
Vol. 19, No. 1 (2002), pp. 153-166
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41669751
Page Count: 14
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
GROUP WORK IN SOCIAL WORK EDUCATION: The Canadian Experience
Preview not available

Abstract

Group work is a central skill in social work, as most social workers are involved with various groups of people on a daily basis. Other professionals, as well as the general public, expect social workers to have expertise in this area. Evidence shows that the teaching of group work is in decline in the United States, especially since the rise of generalist education in social work. This survey of deans and directors and group instructors in Canadian schools inquired about program organization and group work curriculum, instructors' backgrounds, their teaching loads, their orientation to group work, and any needs and suggestions they had to offer concerning support and networking. The results establish that, although most Canadian students receive education in group work, there are gaps and a need to revitalize this crucial aspect of social work education. Le travail de groupe est une aptitude capitale en service social puisque la plupart des travailleurs sociaux interviennent tous les jours auprès de groupes divers. D'autres professionnels et le grand public s'attendent à ce que les travailleurs sociaux s'y connaissent dans le domaine. Les données démontrent que l'enseignement du travail de groupe est en déclin aux États-Unis, surtout depuis la montée de l'enseignement généraliste du service social. Cette enquête auprès des doyens et directeurs des écoles canadiennes de service social et des instructeurs en travail de groupe s'enquérait de l'organisation des programmes et du curriculum de formation au travail de groupe, des antécédents des instructeurs, de leurs charges d'enseignement, de leur orientation vers le travail de groupe et de leurs besoins et leur demandait s'ils avaient des suggestions en matière de soutien et de réseautage. Il appert, selon les résultats, que si la plupart des étudiants canadiens reçoivent une éducation en travail de groupe, il y a des lacunes et il faut revitaliser cet aspect crucial de l'enseignement du service social.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
153
    153
  • Thumbnail: Page 
154
    154
  • Thumbnail: Page 
155
    155
  • Thumbnail: Page 
156
    156
  • Thumbnail: Page 
157
    157
  • Thumbnail: Page 
158
    158
  • Thumbnail: Page 
159
    159
  • Thumbnail: Page 
160
    160
  • Thumbnail: Page 
161
    161
  • Thumbnail: Page 
162
    162
  • Thumbnail: Page 
163
    163
  • Thumbnail: Page 
164
    164
  • Thumbnail: Page 
165
    165
  • Thumbnail: Page 
166
    166