Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Chemically reduced graphene contains inherent metallic impurities present in parent natural and synthetic graphite

Adriano Ambrosi, Chun Kiang Chua, Bahareh Khezri, Zdeněk Sofer, Richard D. Webster and Martin Pumera
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 109, No. 32 (August 7, 2012), pp. 12899-12904
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41685650
Page Count: 6
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Chemically reduced graphene contains inherent metallic impurities present in parent natural and synthetic graphite
Preview not available

Abstract

Graphene-related materials are in the forefront of nanomaterial research. One of the most common ways to prepare graphenes is to oxidize graphite (natural or synthetic) to graphite oxide and exfoliate it to graphene oxide with consequent chemical reduction to chemically reduced graphene. Here, we show that both natural and synthetic graphite contain a large amount of metallic impurities that persist in the samples of graphite oxide after the oxidative treatment, and chemically reduced graphene after the chemical reduction. We demonstrate that, despite a substantial elimination during the oxidative treatment of graphite samples, a significant amount of impurities associated to the chemically reduced graphene materials still remain and alter their electrochemical properties dramatically. We propose a method for the purification of graphenes based on thermal treatment at 1,000 °C in chlorine atmosphere to reduce the effect of such impurities on the electrochemical properties. Our findings have important implications on the whole field of graphene research.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[12899]
    [12899]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12900
    12900
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12901
    12901
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12902
    12902
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12903
    12903
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12904
    12904